spring break broke my pattern – new post

Spring break came up so quickly after my start that it slightly altered my attention span. But the beat goes on.

Have already mentioned in previous posts, though one of which bears re-mentioning here. Because black doctors in the South weren’t allowed by law and custom to join state medical societies, they also couldn’t join the national American Medical Association (AMA, nor could they practice in white hospitals, but that is another story). Then, when the AMA wanted to register their organizational opposition to President Truman’s healthcare plan, of course they sought to solicit the support of black doctors, ultimately admitting one black doctor into membership in an attempt to sway the rest. Though it wasn’t successful, their opposition to the Truman program won out once it was weaponized., i.e.,

National healthcare = socialized medicine = collusion with Russian communism.

The Russian collusion song is indeed an old one.

Ultimately, in the 50’s and 60’s racial barriers to AMA membership for practicing physicians began to dissolve.

This collection I am working on is amazing. First of all, this guy must have had several secretaries to keep all this correspondence buzzing back and forth. I mean he was in relentless contact with fellow faculty members, with members of Congress, with leaders of civil rights organizations, with sports and movie celebrities, with his old high school, with his old undergrad. And they with him. And he was an avid newspaper clippings collector. But wait! You know what happens to newsprint after 70 years, and the paste, and the cellophane tape? Ughh, the cellophane tape. So I am very carefully photocopying each article for preservation. All hundreds of them. I can only imagine if they had email and social media in the 40’s . . .

Adventures on the reference desk continue. Of course, I bring my experiences as a reference and instruction librarian to the table (or to the desk). But so far there seems less emphasis institutionally on actually teaching students the process of accessing archival material, and more of just “bringing them the boxes.” I get it that the level of intermediation is slightly different but because of the difference, I would expect researchers to have (or to want to acquire) a greater knowledge of their subject and of the research process, not a lesser one. Additionally, students seem to want to be able to reduce everything in their research to a mobile phone screenshot and there’s not much patience to be had with anything outside of that. I don’t want to sound like a luddite or anything, but I don’t think effective research can be “optimized” to an iPhone or Galaxy screenshot. If you are coming to my research center, bring a laptop (and pencil and paper) or face my wrath!

It appears we are on the verge of both acquiring an important collection and losing a long standing one. Collections are like money in the bank, literally. And money, I learned as an econ undergrad, is a medium of exchange, a unit of account, and a store of value. So there.

One last, silly thing. The breakroom has a Keurig machine. But I have an ecological problem with the disposable cups that accumulate in the garbage. So I went online and discovered the reusable Keurig cup. I grind my beans, put a scoop or two in the reusable cup, and pack it with my lunch. Works like a charm!

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On Spring Break (and jury duty) – reflections on week 3 at Moorland-Spingarn

A classmate and friend warned me about these week-long breaks. I confess they are quite nice for catching up on projects. We are locked out from the Library for spring break but there is plenty to think about.

I spent last week medicating and recuperating from allergies, internal and external I think. I made it to work each day, with my Flonase and antihistamine gel tabs in tow, packed in my lunch box, along with foil wrapped tumeric ginger tea bags that are expressly not to be sold outside of India. How’s that for authenticity?

Early in the week I went with one of the technicians to the on-campus warehouse to retrieve some boxes. He gave me the grand tour. And what a tour it was. We have a lot of stuff.I peeked through some of the boxes and saw some familiar names from my former career, personal papers of diplomats and members of Congress involved with efforts to increase minority foreign service participation. No comment. But amazing find.

I spent two afternoons on the reference desk. That’s where you actually get a feel for the place, the flow of researchers, the materials in demand. And the phone calls. The phone calls! From an alum, “Do you have my MA thesis from 1978?” And from a local newspaper company, “How many issues do you have of an obscure scholarly journal we published in the early 80’s?” Fun stuff.

Worked with volunteers and student workers on a collection we are all jointly processing. Papers, correspondence, publications by a medical school scholar/professor/activist. Amazing content slows down my processing speed, especially when I start seeing connections to my hometown.

The place is so fascinating. There are moments walking through the stacks when I feel filled up with the spirit of the place and sense that i am able to tap into the energies and the efforts poured into it over the years. Now I am a part of that process, of a great work for my people. Can you believe all those psychic and spiritual benefits, and they pay me?

This week, awaiting jury assignment, I am browsing through “Black Bibliophiles and Collectors: Preservers of Black History.” Finally, I am one of them. I know I have died and gone to heaven.

postscript. Starting an online course this week at the Library Juice Academy. Introduction to Special Collections Librarianship. Great so far. Oh, and entering week 2 of my August Wilson study group. Check out our discussions here: https://augustwilsonstudygroup.wordpress.com/2019/03/13/sosme-notes-on-joe-turners-come-and-gone-and-wilsons-4-bs/

2nd week on the new job

Founders Library, which houses the Moorland-Spingarn Research Center, was named for the 17 founders of Howard University, one of two universities chartered by the U.S. Congress (the other Congressionally chartered university is Galludet University, also in Washington, DC.).  

The founders include Oliver O. Howard, Charles B. Boynton, Samuel C. Pomeroy, Charles H. Howard, Henry A. Brewster, Benjamin F. Morris, Danforth B. Nichols, William G. Finney, Roswell H. Stevens, Burton C. Cook, E. W. Cushman, James B. Hutchinson, Hiram Barber, E. W. Robinson, W.F. Bascom, J.B. Johnson, and Silas L Loomis.  Additional officers included General George W. Balloch, Rev. Henry Highland Garnet, Rev. Byron Sunderland, Rev. D. W. Anderson, Judge Hugh L. Bond, and Rev. J. W. Alvord.  

Quite a distinguished group. Army generals, members of Congress, prominent members of clergy, abolitionists, educators of note.

There was some dispute over whether to create a “normal” school, a theology school or a school of medicine. The charter ultimately specified a “University for the education of youth in the liberal arts and sciences.”   

Here is a photo of the iconic building (OK, I took this one myself!):

Founders Library – Howard University

Early in the week I worked on a very dusty collection that I had started the previous week. Somewhere along the way I developed a bad cold with a wicked cough, forcing me home early in the day. Twice. My boss had sympathy and transferred me to a cleaner, but denser collection until I recuperated. Flonase, antihistimine, and Nyquil helped.

The second collection was the papers of William Montague Cobb, a famous medical educator and the first black PhD in anthropology, one box of photographs and one box of his papers to start. Amazing documents, especially those on the interrelationship between physicians and the first national healthcare program proposed and supported by President Truman. Without going into too much detail, Truman was quite gung ho about a national health plan for all Americans just after his predecessor had ironed out the Social Security plan. But somewhere in the governmental process, a collusion was made between national medicine, socialized medicine, and the Cold War and the plan was stopped dead in its tracks.

I do wonder if the Clintons consulted with Truman’s work when they tried in the 90’s. And I wonder if the Obama folks studied it when they tried it 14 years later. Or are folks just making the same mistakes over and over again, creating the same wobbly wheel at each instance.

Unfortunately, but certainly a part of the process, I also came across medical papers and ghastly photographs of the Tuskegee experiment, also known as the “Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male.” Not in retrospect but while it was going on. And after, mind you, the discovery of antibiotics and their prevalent use during WW2. Really foul stuff.

The contents of the two boxes are all foldered and sorted. I hope we can create a nucleus of organization around which the remaining scores of boxes of material can be arranged and described.

Next week we’ll include a few words about the building’s architecture.