2nd week on the new job

Founders Library, which houses the Moorland-Spingarn Research Center, was named for the 17 founders of Howard University, one of two universities chartered by the U.S. Congress (the other Congressionally chartered university is Galludet University, also in Washington, DC.).  

The founders include Oliver O. Howard, Charles B. Boynton, Samuel C. Pomeroy, Charles H. Howard, Henry A. Brewster, Benjamin F. Morris, Danforth B. Nichols, William G. Finney, Roswell H. Stevens, Burton C. Cook, E. W. Cushman, James B. Hutchinson, Hiram Barber, E. W. Robinson, W.F. Bascom, J.B. Johnson, and Silas L Loomis.  Additional officers included General George W. Balloch, Rev. Henry Highland Garnet, Rev. Byron Sunderland, Rev. D. W. Anderson, Judge Hugh L. Bond, and Rev. J. W. Alvord.  

Quite a distinguished group. Army generals, members of Congress, prominent members of clergy, abolitionists, educators of note.

There was some dispute over whether to create a “normal” school, a theology school or a school of medicine. The charter ultimately specified a “University for the education of youth in the liberal arts and sciences.”   

Here is a photo of the iconic building (OK, I took this one myself!):

Founders Library – Howard University

Early in the week I worked on a very dusty collection that I had started the previous week. Somewhere along the way I developed a bad cold with a wicked cough, forcing me home early in the day. Twice. My boss had sympathy and transferred me to a cleaner, but denser collection until I recuperated. Flonase, antihistimine, and Nyquil helped.

The second collection was the papers of William Montague Cobb, a famous medical educator and the first black PhD in anthropology, one box of photographs and one box of his papers to start. Amazing documents, especially those on the interrelationship between physicians and the first national healthcare program proposed and supported by President Truman. Without going into too much detail, Truman was quite gung ho about a national health plan for all Americans just after his predecessor had ironed out the Social Security plan. But somewhere in the governmental process, a collusion was made between national medicine, socialized medicine, and the Cold War and the plan was stopped dead in its tracks.

I do wonder if the Clintons consulted with Truman’s work when they tried in the 90’s. And I wonder if the Obama folks studied it when they tried it 14 years later. Or are folks just making the same mistakes over and over again, creating the same wobbly wheel at each instance.

Unfortunately, but certainly a part of the process, I also came across medical papers and ghastly photographs of the Tuskegee experiment, also known as the “Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male.” Not in retrospect but while it was going on. And after, mind you, the discovery of antibiotics and their prevalent use during WW2. Really foul stuff.

The contents of the two boxes are all foldered and sorted. I hope we can create a nucleus of organization around which the remaining scores of boxes of material can be arranged and described.

Next week we’ll include a few words about the building’s architecture.

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Author: Raymond Maxwell

https://raymmaxx.wordpress.com/ Librarian, archivist, retired foreign service officer and Navy veteran.

2 thoughts on “2nd week on the new job”

  1. Dear Ray,What a fascinating change of pace for you; sorry about the allergy. I was unable to make your formal exit but I hope that you felt appreciated by many in the Town. If you had stayed longer…..This move was for the best and I am hopeful that we will find someone before Charlie takes out an ad in the Washington Post declaring himself king of it all!Stay well and in touch,Marian

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Marian. The job, wherever it is, has certain occupational hazards. Need to find a mask I can live with. I miss the leisure ride to Maryland each time I transfer to the Green and Yellow line! Oh me! Oh life!

      Like

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